Into the Mix at Out of the Blue

Posted Sep 8, 2016 in General, Our Work

Adam Intern Blog

What comes to mind when you think of an internship? Making copies? Coffee runs? Sitting in a big office full of people who don’t even know you exist?

That’s basically my worst nightmare. Most people will tell you that the purpose of an internship is to gain experience in a field, while also building a network of contacts. And they’re not wrong. The best companies, however, actually utilize their interns. And while your helping hand at an ordinary internship will be appreciated, there’s no comparison to one at which your presence, your input, and your skills are integrated into the projects underway. That’s what Out Of The Blue had to offer, and that’s why I’m staying here for another semester.

This summer at OOTB revolved around Fox Chase Cancer Center. The project: 68 physician profile videos. The production: 10 days of shooting for all the 45 minute interviews, plus B-roll for each doctor. The post: Don’t even ask.

The first day of shooting was my second day at the company. I arrived at the hospital at 6:30 AM and studied the call sheet in my car, trying to remember everybody’s name. As an intern/production assistant on other projects, I’d learned to shy away from asking too many questions and let the professionals do what they do, but I quickly learned that’s not really how an OOTB shoot works. I wasn’t there to observe people making a video, I was going to be one of the people making it. I got right to work as the crew began to set up, staging C-stands for the gaffer and grip, Mike and Mike, respectively. I also learned that I would be operating the second camera for the interviews. The DP, Bill, has a glorious Sony F5 as his primary camera, but also uses a Sony A7sii as his B-cam. For anybody who is a total camera nerd like me, then you know that the A7sii is THE camera to work with these days. Super cool.

Over the course of the project I found myself learning a lot. Not just about production, but also about working long days, being a part of the crew, and even oncology. It’s kind of funny that while it takes a team to make these profile videos, the doctors themselves work in teams to treat patients with cancer every day. There was something special about working alongside some of the world’s best oncologists. The stories we heard from them were compelling, thought provoking, funny, and genuinely inspirational.

When I wasn’t on set, I found myself back at the offline edit suite with fellow interns Mark and Gina stringing out the interviews. OOTB’s director, Ron, producer, Vikki, and production coordinator, Lorraine, along with Gabi, another super nice and bubbly producer, tirelessly penned each script during our office days. Between the three of them, sixty-eight 2-page scripts were crafted from each 45 minute interview and sent to us interns for the first edit.

This workflow threw me head-first into the collaborative editorial process. Cooperative editing in Adobe Premiere CC with OOTB’s in-house editor, Dexter, opened up a new world for me. While I had experience with Premiere, I’d yet to be a part of a larger editorial undertaking. With post becoming a more multi-platform, collaborative process nowadays, it’s nice to have a well-rounded understanding of workflow.

One of the most fulfilling moments of this internship was my realization that I was needed at Out Of The Blue. I began to hold my own both behind the camera and in the edit room. With Lorraine,  I planned and shot a couple B-roll scenes in collaboration with the Fox Chase marketing staff, all causing me to feel like more than just a cog in the machine. I didn’t feel like just an intern.

And now, to get myself a nice cup of coffee.

About the author: ootb


Leave a Reply

*